Auteur Topic: Vraag: Gingen de romeinen er al vanuit dat de aarde rond was? / Globe op romeinse munten  (gelezen 7753 keer)

Offline Christine

  • Vliegende non
  • moderator van dit board
  • Forumlid
  • *
  • Berichten: 12487
  • 0
    • Pinterest: Fingers rings
« Laatst bewerkt op: juli 27, 2009, 21:27:22 pm door Christine »
Groeten, Christine

Offline batavier

  • Deskundige antieke vondsten
  • Forumlid
  • *
  • Berichten: 2025
  • 2
  • ...altijd haantje de voorste...
Trouwens nog 's wat. Die ene heeft zijn voet op een globe.
Gingen de romeinen er al vanuit dat de aarde rond was?

Groet,

Batavier
« Laatst bewerkt op: mei 07, 2009, 18:55:43 pm door Christine »

Offline Christine

  • Vliegende non
  • moderator van dit board
  • Forumlid
  • *
  • Berichten: 12487
  • 0
    • Pinterest: Fingers rings
Nee hoor, bij mijn weten niet.
Voor hun was de wereld ook zo plat als een pannekoek, ik denk dat "globe" of "globus" misschien vertaald moet worden naar "bol":

Tabula Peutingeriana oftewel de4 Peutingerkaart
« Laatst bewerkt op: juli 27, 2009, 21:05:41 pm door Christine »
Groeten, Christine

Offline batavier

  • Deskundige antieke vondsten
  • Forumlid
  • *
  • Berichten: 2025
  • 2
  • ...altijd haantje de voorste...
Ja dat dacht ik dus ook.

Maar dan is het toch raar dat ze zomaar een bolletje weergeven.
Wanneer het geen wereldbol is moet het toch iets anders voorstellen.
De zon?

Batavier
« Laatst bewerkt op: mei 07, 2009, 18:56:15 pm door Christine »

Offline Christine

  • Vliegende non
  • moderator van dit board
  • Forumlid
  • *
  • Berichten: 12487
  • 0
    • Pinterest: Fingers rings
Mmmm, ja, tja.....eigenlijk.....HELP

Natuurlijk ken ik vele romeinse munten waarop op de een of andere manier een "globe" op staat.
Ik heb het me misschien ooit wel eens vaag afgevraagd, want is het nu een bolvormig ding, een of andere planeet, de zon, of toch de aarde??

Misschien dat Lx er iets over kan zeggen, die is altijd wel goed in dit soort dingen  ;)


Misschien helpt onderstaand stuk al een beetje:


Globes on Ancient Coins

Globes on Ancient Coins
by Michael E. Marotta
The average person in Hellenic and Roman times knew that our
world is round.  Th philosophic inquiries and dialogs that began
with Thales reached their peak with Aristotle.  Later, various
hellenistic astronomers made measurements of the size of the
Earth and the sizes of and distances to the Sun and Moon.
Several schemes for explaining the motions of the planets were
invented.  Generally, the average person of those times did not
believe Earth to be flat any more than the average person of our
day believes that we are alone in the galaxy.

Pythagoras  was probably the first to assert that Earth is a
sphere.  The other candidate for originating this insight is
Parmenides of Elea.  However, later than them, Anaxagoras of
Klazomenae said that our world is "cylindrical", i.e., shaped
like a modern coin.  Democritus agreed.  In his books, On the
Heavens, Aristotle notes the reasons offered by Anaxagoras and
Democritus for asserting that Earth is flat. Then he argues
against them, and states:

        "These conditions will be provided, even though
        the Earth is spherical, if it is of the requisite
        size..."

For Aristotle, the Earth was round.  So it remained for perhaps
1,000 years.  Aristarchus of Samos measured the size and distance
of the Moon and Sun.  He also placed the Earth in orbit around
the sun.  Archimedes of Syracuse argued against this on the
soundest of principles: parallax.  If Earth orbits the sun, then
there should be an apparent shift in position of the stars
relative to the sun and this had not been observed.  Eratosthenes
of Cyrene measured the circumference of the Earth by comparing
shadows on the first day of Summer.

Celestial devices appear on coins from the classical period
forward.    There are many such examples of stars, astrogali,
solar disks, etc., on coins. The earliest coins that have
terrestrial globes on them are from Uranopolis ("Sky City") in
Macedonia, which was founded on Mt. Athos about 300 BCE by
Alexarchos, brother of the king Kassander. Catalogued as BMC 5.1,
et seq., (Sear GCV 1474, et seq.), they show Aphrodite Urania
seated on a globe.

Klazomenae honored Anaxagoras by putting him on their coins.  The
BMC Ionia for this town lists three: 102, 103 and 104.  (BMC
Ionia Claz 104 is Sear GCV 4335.)  All show an anonymous young
man on the obverse.  On the reverse, a man is seated on globe and
he holds another globe in his hand.  A coin of Roman imperial
times (BMC 125) shows Commodus on the obverse.  On the reverse, a
man stands facing right, naked to the waist, holding a globe.
Greek writers in Roman times recorded that Klazomenae honored
Anaxagoras by putting his image on their coins.

Struck during the reign of Trajan, a coin from Samos honors
Pythagoras (BMC Ionia Samos 237).  The reverse shows Pythagoras
touching a globe with a wand.  This same theme appeared on coins
struck for Septimus Severus, Julia Mamaea, Trajan Decius, and
Etruscilla.  The Severans relied on even more heavily on
astrologers than the average person and the assumption is that
this caused them to honor Pythagoras as no one had before.  Since
the globe appears without a diety such as Sol or Jupiter or the
emperor, we can assume that these globes represent our planet.
And, indeed, unlike Anaxagoras, Pythagoras really did assert that
Earth is a sphere.

Of course, many Roman coins have globes on them.  In an article
in THE CELATOR for November of 1991, G. Derk Dodson suggested
that not all "globes" are representations of the planet.
Dodsons's thesis is that some of them are "lumina" or halos.
These are balls or circles of holy light that deify.  Dodson
cites many examples of the emperor being handed the symbol of his
deity.  Even so, not all globes are halos.  Halos don't sit on
the ground.  A globe at the foot of Providentia is a globe.

Once I started looking for globes, they became easy to find. I
have a Providentia/Globe denarius from Marcus Aurelius and
another from Trajan, both for about $50 at the ANA Denver.  The
denarius of Trajan commemorates his victory over the Parthians.
The globe at the foot of Providentia even has a chain around it:
the world wrapped and ribboned for Rome.

Also in my collection are two quandrantes from the time of
Vespasian. One is a contemporary counterfeit of the other. One
side has a caduceus, the other a globe and rudder.  At the ANA
Cleveland, I found a pitted and cleaned example of the
Uraniopolis issue.  For me, this little dog is one of my pride-
and-joy coins.  It proves that in ancient times, everyone knew
that the Earth is a ball.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Aristotle, On the Heavens.  W. K. C. Guthrie, M.A., editor and
translator.  Loeb Classic Library, Harvard University Press, 1939
and 1971.

Diels, Herman. Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker. Walther Kranz,
editor. Weidmann Press, Dublin and Zurich, 1903 and 1968.

Heath, Sir Thomas L., Greek Astronomy, J. M. Dent & Sons, 1932
and AMS Press, New York, 1969.

« Laatst bewerkt op: januari 06, 2014, 00:48:28 am door Christine »
Groeten, Christine

Offline Goodies

  • moderator boards
  • Forumjunk
  • *
  • Berichten: 48666
  • 0
Ok, dat lijkt me duidelijk..

Citaat
The globe at the foot of Providentia even has a chain around it:
the world wrapped and ribboned for Rome.

De Romeinen gingen niet uit van een platte wereld. Alleen hadden ze geen idee van de omvang van de globe.

"The Greek philosopher Aristotle (384-322 BC) argued in his writings that the Earth was spherical, because of the circular shadow it cast on the Moon"

De griekse filosoof Eratosthenes (3e eeuw BC) had de omvang van de aarde met wiskundige methodes bepaald.

De Romeinse geleerde Strabo (ook 3e eeuw BC) beweerde, dat de aarde veel kleiner was, dwz dat je naar het westen kon varen om India te bereiken,

" Notice that Strabo--for unclear reasons--reduced the 250,000 Stadia of Eratosthenes to 180,000, and then stated that half of that distance came to just 70,000 stadia. Handling his numbers in that loose fashion, he could argue that India was not far to the west. "

Zie: http://www.mig.rssi.ru/mirrors/stern/stargaze/Scolumb.htm

De Peutinger kaart is een reis-kaart kon worden opgevouwen, oorspronkelijk bestond het uit 11 losse perkamenten. De inhoud was afgeleid van het beschrijvende werk van Strabo. In feite is het een Romeinse wegenkaart, waarbij alleen de afstanden in horizontale richting kloppen. In verticale richting is de kaart sterk samengeperst.

:)
Lx
« Laatst bewerkt op: mei 07, 2009, 18:56:57 pm door Christine »

Offline Christine

  • Vliegende non
  • moderator van dit board
  • Forumlid
  • *
  • Berichten: 12487
  • 0
    • Pinterest: Fingers rings
Even wat plaatjes zoeken genoemd in het artikel hierboven.



Pythagoras, die als eerste zei dat de wereld rond was, staat op de keerzijde van een munt van Trajanus. (BMC Ionia Samos 237)
Bron

Nogmaals de munt.

Pythagoras touches a globe. Roman coin from Samos, from the time of Trajan.
Bron









Quadrans van Vespasianus, RIC 569
« Laatst bewerkt op: januari 03, 2015, 18:27:28 pm door Christine »
Groeten, Christine

Offline Christine

  • Vliegende non
  • moderator van dit board
  • Forumlid
  • *
  • Berichten: 12487
  • 0
    • Pinterest: Fingers rings
Tja, ik weet het niet hoor, het lijkt erop dat men nog steeds naarstig op zoek is naar echt bewijs.
Bolvormën komen op vele munten voor, maar vaak is het ook bijvoorbeeld de zon, of een halos, etc
Of het echt algemeen gedachtengoed was?

Ook de peutingerkaart daarbij in gedachten nemend;
Citaat Lx:
In feite is het een Romeinse wegenkaart, waarbij alleen de afstanden in horizontale richting kloppen. In verticale richting is de kaart sterk samengeperst.

En een citaat uit Wikipedia - Platte aarde
De Ionische (Griekse) natuurfilosofen uit de zesde eeuw voor Christus onder wie Anaximandros kwamen tot de conclusie dat de Aarde een korte cilinder was met een platte, ronde top


Dus dat de peutingerkaart een opvouwbare wegenkaart was, ok, maar als je hem rondvouwt....misschien was het ook wel een weergave van de aarde zoals zij dachten dat de aarde was??


Pythagoras zei wel dat de aarde volledig bolvormig was.

En..............  er is een munt die voor mij alles ineens heel plausible maakt:  ((look:9:


Julia Domna
Denarius, d=20 mm, 3.34 g. 196-211
Voorzijde: IVLIA – AVGVSTA Gedrapeerde buste naar rechts.
Keerzijde: FECVNDITAS Terra (moeder aarde?) onder een boom in rusthouding liggend naar links,
linkerarm op een fruitmand en haar rechterhand op een globe met sterren omgeven waarover zich 4 kinderen (de 4 seizoenen) bewegen.
RIC S. Severus 549. BMC S. Severus 21. C 35.
Bron: CoinArchives
« Laatst bewerkt op: mei 07, 2009, 18:58:01 pm door Christine »
Groeten, Christine

Offline aurelianus

  • Kundige Romeins / Middeleeuws
  • moderator van dit board
  • Forumlid
  • *
  • Berichten: 23623
  • 15
  • Een munt is tastbare geschiedenis! 160904b160205
Interessante bijdrage,
Hoe de Romeinen zich de aarde voorstellen is me niet duidelijk,
ik weet dat er in die tijd stukken geschreven zijn over een (Grieks wetenschappelijk) bolvormige aarde, platte aarde (mogelijk onder het  'gewone'volk?)
en (heel zelden) cilindrische  aarde.
Ik neem zelf aan dat die ideeën naast elkaar bestonden, afhankelijk van de groep.
Ook de onderwereld, moet men dat letterlijk nemen ? Zou dan een bolvorm hebben, als de aarde een bolvorm heeft.
Het firnament, of uitspansel werd  bol verbeeld (herkenbaar aan de sterren op de bol?) een bol om de aartde.
De aarde (of de almacht van de Romeinen) op munten werd als een bol voorgesteld???
« Laatst bewerkt op: maart 22, 2018, 15:15:03 pm door aurelianus »
met vriendelijke groet, aurelianus.
Mijn bijdragen dienen uitsluitend educatieve doelen
Bij gebruik van (delen van) de inhoud van dit bericht dient mijn forumnaam en MBF als bron te worden vermeld!
:)

Offline Christine

  • Vliegende non
  • moderator van dit board
  • Forumlid
  • *
  • Berichten: 12487
  • 0
    • Pinterest: Fingers rings
Hoi aurelianus,

Niet elke "bol" die werd afgebeeld was dus de aarde. Of wel? En moeten de munten in een ander licht worden gezien.
Victoria op globe, is dat dan een teken van wereldmacht?
Als we alle munten opnieuw gaan bekijken en beschrijven, kunnen we er dan een nieuwe uitleg aan geven, waarbij de bolvorm in de meeste gevallen de aarde voorsteld?
We moeten niet vergeten dat de munten al heel lang geleden zijn beschreven, in een tijd waarin men een ander gedachtengoed heeft als tegenwoordig.

Net zoals we ook nu nog op school leren dat men in de late middeleeuwen dacht dat de aarde plat was, terwijl dit ook echt niet zo is.


Afbeelding van een editie uit 1550 van: "Over de wereldbol",
het invloedrijkste astronomische boek uit de 13e eeuw



Een heel aardig stuk in Wikipedia om door te lezen is Platte Aarde


Terug komend op de romeinen, wat vind je van de munt van Julia Domna in het vorige bericht?
« Laatst bewerkt op: juli 27, 2009, 21:26:38 pm door Christine »
Groeten, Christine

Offline Goodies

  • moderator boards
  • Forumjunk
  • *
  • Berichten: 48666
  • 0
hoi,

Nog even over de Peutinger: we mogen uit de langwerpige vorm ervan m.i. niet afleiden dat de Romeinen de wereld als een cylinder zagen. Er zijn veel eenvoudiger verklaringen:  misschien is de zee niet weergegeven op de Peutinger kaart, eenvoudigweg om plaats te besparen op het perkament ! En deze kaart is gebaseerd op een beschrijving in dagreizen, niet op metingen van afstand. Op zee heb je geen idee van snelheid. Daardoor is het veel lastiger om de afstanden goed in te schatten.

@aurelianus, het ''firmament'' kun je ook zien als iets wat om de aarde is gewikkeld.. op deze munt van Trajanus die Christine aanhaalde,



.. is het ''firmament'' een band, dwz de melkweg en de ecliptica, dus het vlak waarin de planeten zich bewegen. In mddeleeuwse astrologische handboeken vind je dezelfde band, geannoteerd met planeetsymbolen en sterren.

:)
Lx
« Laatst bewerkt op: juli 27, 2009, 21:25:08 pm door Christine »

Offline Christine

  • Vliegende non
  • moderator van dit board
  • Forumlid
  • *
  • Berichten: 12487
  • 0
    • Pinterest: Fingers rings
Re: Vraag: Gingen de romeinen er al vanuit dat de aarde rond was? / Globe op romeinse munten
« Reactie #11 Gepost op: september 15, 2009, 00:29:43 am »
Deze wil ik er ook graag nog even bij plaatsen.
Een ring met sterrenbeelden


Constantine I. (307-337 AD). Gold solidus (4.43 gm). Ticinum, 315 AD. CONSTANTI—NVS P F AVG, head
laureate right / RECTOR TOTIVS ORBIS, Constantine
in military dress seated left on cuirass and two
shields, resting right hand on zodiac band and holding
parazonium in left, at right Victory standing left behind
him places wreath on his head and holds palm, S•M•T
in exergue; the zodiac band shows the three signs Taurus,
Gemini, and Cancer. Unpublished mintmark variant of
the previously unique aureus in BM, RIC 54 = Depeyrot
16/4 (p. 72) = Cohen 643 (800 francs). The second
known specimen, and a new variant, of this spectacular
type, with the zodiac signs Bull, Twins, and Crab actually
depicted on the zodiac band held by the emperor. Nearly
mint state/extremely fine. The previously unique BM solidus with this reverse type
has mintmark SMT, not S.M.T as on our coin. This reverse
type, calling Constantine RECTOR TOTIVS ORBIS, "The
Master of the Whole World," seems to refer to his defeat
of Maxentius in 312, since a similar type of the emperor
seated holding zodiac, but without the figure of Victory
crowning him, also struck at Ticinum at about the same
time, calls the emperor RESTITVTOR LIBERTATIS, "The
Restorer of Liberty," the epithet Constantine assumed for
eliminating Maxentius (RIC 39 and 55).

Estimate: US$25000
Price realized  20000 USD  

Bron: acsearch
Groeten, Christine

Offline Goodies

  • moderator boards
  • Forumjunk
  • *
  • Berichten: 48666
  • 0
Re: Vraag: Gingen de romeinen er al vanuit dat de aarde rond was? / Globe op romeinse munten
« Reactie #12 Gepost op: september 15, 2009, 00:49:34 am »
heeeee @Christine,

Dat is een heel beroemde en nogal megalomane keerzijde van Constantinus. ''RECTOR TOTIVS ORBIS''  ):(

En dan te bedenken, dat Constantijn de eerste christelijke keizer was. In elk geval niet met bescheidenheid !

Dit is trouwens ook een beroemde munt in astrologen-kringen. Niet alleen bewijst het stuk, dat ook onder Constantijn de astrologie een levende traditie was met een herkenbare symboliek, maar ook dat die symboliek dezelfde was als de op dit moment gebruikte, in dezelfde volgorde. Zie deze plaatjes.. De lente-evening (aan de voet van de keizer) begint met Ram, dan Tweeling, dan Stier. Het enige verschil met de moderne weergave is dat de Romeinse dierenriem met de klok meeliep. Ik denk dat dat te maken had met de richting van de schaduw (zonnewijzer)

Hieronder nog iets leuks voor dit topic: de oudst bekende wereldbol, de Farnese Atlas

Op deze bol zijn geen landmassa's afgebeeld zoals op de moderne globe, maar een symbolische weergave van de sterrenhemel. Voor de Romeinen was de Westelijke sterrenhemel dus geprojecteerd op een bol. Die bol was welliswaar veel te klein, maar toch..

''The Farnese Atlas is a 2nd-century Roman marble copy of a Hellenistic sculpture of Atlas kneeling with a globe weighing heavily on his shoulders. It is the oldest extant statue of the Titan of Greek mythology, who is represented in earlier vase-painting, and more importantly the oldest known representation of the celestial sphere. The sculpture is at the National Archaeological Museum (Museo Archeologico Nazionale) [1] in Naples, Italy. It stands seven feet (2.1 meters) tall, and the globe is 65 cm in diameter.

Atlas labors under the weight because he had been sentenced by Zeus to hold up the sky. The globe shows a depiction of the night sky as seen from outside the outermost celestial sphere, with low reliefs depicting 41 (some sources say 42) of the 48 classical Greek constellations distinguished by Ptolemy, including; Aries the ram, Cygnus the swan and Hercules the hero. The Farnese Atlas is the oldest surviving pictorial record of Western constellations. It dates to Roman times, around AD 150, but has long been presumed to represent constellations mapped in earlier Greek work.''

:)
Lx
« Laatst bewerkt op: september 15, 2009, 00:53:56 am door Goodies »

Offline Christine

  • Vliegende non
  • moderator van dit board
  • Forumlid
  • *
  • Berichten: 12487
  • 0
    • Pinterest: Fingers rings
Re: Vraag: Gingen de romeinen er al vanuit dat de aarde rond was? / Globe op romeinse munten
« Reactie #13 Gepost op: september 15, 2009, 01:12:58 am »
Mooi  ((: 9prima


Echt bescheiden was Constantinus niet nee.

Trouwens behalve deze munt met de afgebeelde tekens (dus een stier die er als stier uitziet etc.), bestaat deze munt ook als ander type met de tekens van de dierenriem zelf.
Groeten, Christine

Offline Christine

  • Vliegende non
  • moderator van dit board
  • Forumlid
  • *
  • Berichten: 12487
  • 0
    • Pinterest: Fingers rings
Deze moet ik er ook bij plaatsen hoor!


Voor meer info over deze munt, zie: Gewoon prachtig


Het mooie aan deze munt is dat er TELLVS STABIL staat, oftewel Tellus Stabilita, wat zoveel betekent als "gehandhaafde aarde"


Uit wikipedia: Tellus

Het beeld van Tellus stabilita (gehandhaafde aarde) werd met de symbolen van de akkerbouw door Romeinse keizers, die de orde en de veiligheid in de staat hadden hersteld, op hun munten gestempeld. Tot slot is zij ook een godin van de echt.

In de tijd van keizer Augustus werd Tellus verdrongen door Ceres en door Terra Mater. Daarom zijn er weinig restanten van de verering van Tellus teruggevonden.




Hieronder nog een "mozaiek uit een Romeinse Villa in Sentinum uit 200-250 v. Chr. van Aion en Tellus met vier kinderen, misschien de seizoenen"
Bron Wikipedia: Terra Mater
« Laatst bewerkt op: januari 08, 2011, 01:31:38 am door Christine »
Groeten, Christine

Offline Goodies

  • moderator boards
  • Forumjunk
  • *
  • Berichten: 48666
  • 0
 :o :o oogverblindend wat een schitterend stuk..

Offline Christine

  • Vliegende non
  • moderator van dit board
  • Forumlid
  • *
  • Berichten: 12487
  • 0
    • Pinterest: Fingers rings
Uit: Wikipedia; Spherical Earth

The concept of a spherical Earth dates back to ancient Greek philosophy from around
the 6th century BC, but remained a matter of philosophical speculation until the
3rd century BC when Hellenistic astronomy established the spherical shape of
the earth as a physical given.

Roman Empire
From its Greek origins, the idea of a spherical earth, along with much of Greek astronomical thought,
slowly spread across the globe and ultimately became the adopted view in all major astronomical
traditions:
In the west, the idea came naturally to the Romans through the lengthy process of cross-fertilization
with Hellenistic civilization.
Many Roman authors such as Cicero and Pliny refer in their works to the rotundity of the earth
as a matter of course.
Groeten, Christine

Offline Goodies

  • moderator boards
  • Forumjunk
  • *
  • Berichten: 48666
  • 0
Citaat
, but remained a matter of philosophical speculation until the
3rd century BC when Hellenistic astronomy established the spherical shape of
the earth as a physical given.

De klassieke Griekse filosofen beredeneerden dat de aarde een bol moest zijn, omdat dat een perfect lichaam is. Eerlijk gezegd is het niet uit te sluiten, dat de Grieken het bewijs pas in de 3e eeuw door hun verre expedities oostwaarts hebben verkregen ! Erastostenes  (276 v.Chr. - 194 v.Chr.) heeft de eerste poging gedaan om de omtrek van de aarde te meten..

Die scheiding tussen het "klassieke" (6e BC) en het "Hellenistische" (3e BC) Griekenland heeft te maken met Alexander de Grote, de expedities naar India. Voor het eerst gingen mensen zo ver reizen, dat ze vanuit de astronomie konden afleiden, dat de aarde rond moest zijn.

Misschien is het makkelijker voor een cultuur, om erachter te komen dat de aarde bolvormig is, wanneer het land groot genoeg is ? Zie ook het Chinese scheppingsverhaal.. de schild van de schildpad is een halve bol.

:)
Lx


Offline Christine

  • Vliegende non
  • moderator van dit board
  • Forumlid
  • *
  • Berichten: 12487
  • 0
    • Pinterest: Fingers rings
Re: Vraag: Gingen de romeinen er al vanuit dat de aarde rond was? / Globe op romeinse munten
« Reactie #18 Gepost op: december 10, 2013, 17:34:21 pm »
Italia gezeten op de aarde?

Italia Turrita
Roman coins reproduced the allegorical representation of Italy as a dressed and towered woman who sometimes carries a cornucopia. The towered crown is the symbol of Civitas romana, therefore the allegory shows the sovereignty of the Italian peninsula as a land of free cities and of Roman citizens to whom a proper right has been granted: the Ius Italicum

Onderstaande munt:
Antoninus Pius (138-161)
Denarius (2,99g), Roma, 140-143 n.Chr.
Av.: ANTONINVS - AVG PIVS P P, Kopf mit Lorbeerkranz n.r.
Rv.: TR POT - COS III, Italia mit Cornucopiae und Szepter auf Globus n.l.
RIC 85, RSC 890.

Bron
« Laatst bewerkt op: december 10, 2013, 17:52:28 pm door Christine »
Groeten, Christine

Offline Christine

  • Vliegende non
  • moderator van dit board
  • Forumlid
  • *
  • Berichten: 12487
  • 0
    • Pinterest: Fingers rings
Re: Vraag: Gingen de romeinen er al vanuit dat de aarde rond was? / Globe op romeinse munten
« Reactie #19 Gepost op: december 10, 2013, 18:56:28 pm »

Hieronder nog iets leuks voor dit topic: de oudst bekende wereldbol, de Farnese Atlas

Op deze bol zijn geen landmassa's afgebeeld zoals op de moderne globe, maar een symbolische weergave van de sterrenhemel. Voor de Romeinen was de Westelijke sterrenhemel dus geprojecteerd op een bol. Die bol was welliswaar veel te klein, maar toch..

''The Farnese Atlas is a 2nd-century Roman marble copy of a Hellenistic sculpture of Atlas kneeling with a globe weighing heavily on his shoulders. It is the oldest extant statue of the Titan of Greek mythology, who is represented in earlier vase-painting, and more importantly the oldest known representation of the celestial sphere. The sculpture is at the National Archaeological Museum (Museo Archeologico Nazionale) [1] in Naples, Italy. It stands seven feet (2.1 meters) tall, and the globe is 65 cm in diameter.

Atlas labors under the weight because he had been sentenced by Zeus to hold up the sky. The globe shows a depiction of the night sky as seen from outside the outermost celestial sphere, with low reliefs depicting 41 (some sources say 42) of the 48 classical Greek constellations distinguished by Ptolemy, including; Aries the ram, Cygnus the swan and Hercules the hero. The Farnese Atlas is the oldest surviving pictorial record of Western constellations. It dates to Roman times, around AD 150, but has long been presumed to represent constellations mapped in earlier Greek work.''

:)
Lx

Even hierop terug komend.

De sterrenbeelden staan afgebeeld, voor ons als toeschouwer van buitenaf, met de rug naar ons toe,
wat dus aangeeft dat de sterrenbeelden vanaf de globe frontaal gezien worden.

Hij draagt echt de wereld op zijn rug?
Bron
Groeten, Christine